Chevy HHR. 2.4 litre.Question: is it hard to replace the lower control arm bushings.

Answer: Replacing the lower control arm bushings is not that hard at all. You need to get the car up on jack stands or a lift and remove the front wheels.

Answer: The ball joint, rear mount bolt and two front mount bolts need to be removed and then you can swing the control arm out of it's mounting brackets. You'll need an air hammer or a press to remove the old bushing, even if the rubber falls right out, the steel ring will need to be pressed or hammered out. The best way to install a new bushing is by using a press. You may not have access to one and have to find some other way to get it installed, but be careful and make sure to keep it centered. After that, reinstall the control arm and repeat for the other side. See some great pictures here.

Control arm bushing replacement.


Leave your comments

Post comment as a guest

0

    Comments
    Subscribe To These Comments-----   

    • No comments yet.

    Latest Articles

    Car Stalls After Filling With ...

    I have been taking my car to get it fixed because the check ...

    Chevy Impala No Driver Side ...

    My 2006 Chevy Impala was recently wrecked on the driver ...

    Jeep Cheroke Code P1764 Repair

    I have a 2004 grand Cherokee and check engine came on. Code ...

    Suburban Wont start warm but ...

    Chevy Suburban will start cold, but only once unless it ...

    Buick Lesabre Climate Control ...

    2000 BUICK LESABRE,CLIMATE CONTROL MODULE,BLOWER MOTOR,AC, ...

    How Things Work

    Brakes- Rear Drum- How Do They Work

    The drum brake system consists of the following:

    Drum Brake Shoes: Applies mechanical output force, from hydraulic brake wheel cylinders, to friction surface of brake drums.

    Brake Drums: Uses mechanical output force applied to friction surface from drum brake shoes to slow speed of tire and wheel assembly rotation.

    Read more...

    Common Engine Codes

    Oxygen Sensor Code P0130 - P0141

    The powertrain control module (PCM) supplies a bias voltage of about 450 mV between the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) high signal circuit and the HO2S low reference circuit. When measured with a 10 mega ohm digital voltmeter, this may display as low as 350 mV. The oxygen sensor signal varies from about 800 mV when the exhaust is rich, to about 50 mV when the exhaust is lean.

    Read more...