2006 Chevrolet Impala. Question: What could be the problem with a ticking noise coming from the dashboard. sounds like a machine gun. Ive heard that it could be an air duct flapping out of control. The ticking begins whenever i use my air or heat controls

 

Answer: Yes, this sounds like one of the heater / AC door motors is making the noise. There are several in the dash. There is a motor, also called an actuator, for the mode selection- defrost, floor or vent position. There is also one for the temperature door or doors if you have dual zone A/C. Then there would be one for each side. There is a also one for the blend door, which works in conjunction with the mode door.

 

Determining which one is noisy can be difficult. With a scan tool that can read HVAC data, you would be able to see the position of the door motors as a numeric value, then you could see the one that is moving around. Most people of course do not have this scanner, and only some of the higher end local shops would. The dealer definitely does. You could try switching positions on the control unit to floor, vent, defrost, hot cold, etc and try to pick out the one that is making the noise.

 

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Comments  

 
# Guest 2014-07-01 23:31
Will a/c work with one of the motors unplug
 
 
# Mechanic Joe 2014-07-16 04:06
Yes, the A/C will work fine. With one of the motors unplugged, just that side will not function properly.
 

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