2006 Chevrolet Trail blazer LS. Question: trying to remove my dash so that i may get at the switch that changes from a 2 wheel to auto to 4 hi to 4 low the switch is broken and needs to be replace but no one will say how to get at this switch.

 

Answer: First you need to remove the left side dash cover that is viewed with the door open. Then the lower dash panel under your feet and the panel level with your knees. There are several 7mm screws that hold these two pieces on. This will give you access to the screws to the left of the steering column that hold on the large bezel that goes around the instrument cluster and the radio. Remove the 2 screws that go up into the the panel around the instrument cluster- best viewed from under the steering column looking up. There is also 2 screws under the heater air conditioning controls. To the left and right of the cigar / accessory outlet. Then that whole panel can be pulled off. Work your hands around the panel getting your fingers behind it to release the locking tabs. Tilt the steering wheel down and pull the bezel out. Then disconnect the 4WD switch electrical connector. The switch pushes through the panel outward- not into the dash, but out from the back side. Then the new switch pushes into the panel from the front.

 

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